a paradox of though

Allen writes, “I hated work that has to be done over; washing dishes, sweeping floors, paying bills. As a boy I had to chop weeds between rows of corn; all spring and summer they would grow and I’d chop them, and always they grew back. I never finished. So little time to shape permanence, and this was wasting it; and as I grew older I avoided or minimized everything that gets repeated – writing letters, even eating. It’s quicker to get a hamburger at the joint on the corner, to stand up and wolf it down, than to sit at a table set with linen and silver and crystal. The hunger for immortality makes food plain. I had no flowers; they have to be watered, fertilized, pruned, and put in the sun, and whatever you do to them you have to do again; you’re never through. Houses have to be painted, roofs patched, plumbing fixed, furnaces cleaned; I lived in furnished rooms. Pets have to be fed and walked and taken to the vet. I had none. Friendships too have to be looked after; so mine were few. My wish to live forever was in a fair way of preventing me from living at all. The sacrifice upon which talent was to flourish was starving any talent I may have had.”   Allen Wheelis from the “the illusionless man”

Marianne Williamson writes, “Our greatest weakness is the weakness of an undisciplined mind.  We need not let fear steel the morning; we can consciously choose not to allow our minds to be programmed by the worldly viewpoint that dominates the earth. “

And Marianne continues, “Remember, it’s not just the workers but souls who are gathered in the workplace; we’re not just here to ‘achieve’ in a worldly sense, but to spiritually learn and grow.  That is the purpose of work, because it is the ultimate purpose of everything.  The ego’s work drama is always centered on who does what, who works for whom, and how much money can be made.  But beneath the ego’s drama lies a deeper set of issues.”

Where do you fit?  Where do you want to fit?

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